Tag: culture


Puzzy Patrol @Gamla Bíó

Puzzy Patrol @Gamla Bíó

The vibe was amazing last Saturday at Gamla Bíó. Puzzy Patrol ( an event management company ) hosted a lecture run by Laufey Ólafsdóttir about her Bachelor theisis on “Hip-Hop feminism, the marketing of culture and silencing of a loud minority”. After her presentation there was an interesting discussion from the panel that featured Erpur Eyvindarson (Blaz Roca) Anna Tara (Reykjavíkurdætur and Vigdís Howser (Fever dream).     I was looking forward to grabbing some food after the lecture and heading back to Gamla Bió to see the impressive lineup of artists that included ALVIA, Cell7, Fever Dream, Reykjavíkurdætur, Krakk & Spaghettí and Sigga Ey. The gig was absolutely amazing with Sigga Ey the newcomer, blowing me away.  Cell 7 NEVER seizes to amaze me but I have been a fan of hers since 1997. Reykavíkurdætur closed the show with incredible sass and girl power. Can´t wait to see what Puzzy Patrol is up to next. For more info on them , check out their Facebook page HERE


Icelandic power women featured in vouge!!

Icelandic power women featured in vouge!!

During my morning fashion surf across the world wide web I came across an article on vouge.com A fasinating read about strong Icelandic women and their favourite places in Iceland. The first one that caught my eye was Glowie a former Reykjavik Fashion and Design cover girl. Here is what she had to say:   Glowie, musician, Her spot: The beach close to Viðey harbor, where she often comes with her boyfriend (pictured). “One of our first dates we came here. It’s a special place for us and very romantic. I live near here as well.” There are also frequent daily ferries to Viðey island, which feels like going back in time. Music notes: “The music industry is really different here in Iceland. It’s kind of a mixture of straight pop and more left-side indie music. I grew up around a family who was all in music and I listened to everything from gospel choirs to Outkast and Craig David. That made me who I am—my style and my sound. It’s a mixture of hip-hop, R&B, and Icelandic influences.” Look: “I’ve always been unafraid to be different. I look for things that no one else here is wearing. I shop a lot of vintage stores. I only wear retro Buffalo platform shoes now. I love the ’90s—that’s my favorite style decade. When I was younger, people would say I was a mixture of Rihanna and Beyoncé. But I don’t want to be the next anybody. I want to be the first Glowie.” My Reykjavik: “The fresh air, the clean water, the language. When I’m in London talking to people in English all day, I miss just speaking Icelandic. The architecture is really different here, too. You definitely want to explore all the new buildings downtown by the water and also the…


Happy Reykjavik Gay Pride 2017

Happy Reykjavik Gay Pride 2017

One of my favorite events of the year in Gay Pride. I love the festivities, color and overall how everyone is so happy to come together and celebrate love and respect for each other. Reykjavik Pride brings thousands of people together and it lasts for little under a week. The parade starts today at 2PM from Hverfisgata by Ingólfsstræti to Hljómskálagarður Park. See you there 🙂    


Fabulous Fabularum of Helga Thoroddsen

Fabulous Fabularum of Helga Thoroddsen

I am very excited for a new exhibition opening this Saturday. Helga Thoroddsen will be doing  her first solo show at only twenty three years old. We got Lina Batov curator at Listastofan,  to tell us a bit about Helga and her exhibition Fabularum and interview Helga before her big show.   Helga chose a resonant Latin name, which derives from fabula – tale, story, play – fitting for the exhibition theme. Not surprising, it is also a feminine word, that sums up this show perfectly. Almost all of the paintings of the Fabularum exhibition are inhabited by female figures, coming from myths and legends, mostly from Icelandic folklore. As well as some pop personalities, such as Madonna, Lady Gaga and our favorite – Björk, raised to the status of divinity, depicting our modern culture in the fabric of the mythological. Her subjects make strong reference to the religious and mythical, never glorifying it, but as a statement of how religion overtook art for centuries. You may happen to recognize the artist in some of the paintings, appearing in the features of her heroines, melting into her characters. At the same extent she is painting just women, there is reverence and beauty in each of them. Helga’s paintings have something staggeringly real, at the same time they are strongly marked by symbolism, and this contrast is striking and appealing. Additionally a most pleasant thing about her paintings remains a great sense of humor. There is no pretense in her art, but a skilfully crafted sense of joy emanating from her work. It is clear that she loves people and she loves the paint brush which is wielded with skill and intelligence. Soft smiled twenty-three year old Helga comes from Selfoss and likes to think she shares her birthplace with Björk. Freshly graduated…


DJ culture in Reykjavík

DJ culture in Reykjavík

By: Lovísa Arnardóttir Photos curtesy of: Aníta Björk, Ársæll and Dj Kocoon Article from the winter issue 2016 Follow my blog with Bloglovin I have been a DJ in Reykjavík for five years. I’m part of a duo called Kanilsnældur. We play house and sometimes techno, and we are female DJ’s. We both have day jobs but DJ’ing is an integral and important part of our lives. As it is dark for almost nine months of the year in Iceland, I think a lot of people turn to music to express themselves. Mostly, it keeps us from becoming depressed in the cold, long and dark winter nights (and days). Iceland has a large and thriving DJ culture. On an average weekend you may find everything from reggae to rock to hard-core techno. You won’t find all genres during the same night, mostly because there are not that many places to go, but over a whole weekend (which of course includes Thursday) you will find a good mix of genres around downtown Reykjavík. Because there are not many bars or clubs that play each genre, it is hard for DJ’s to get booked every weekend. Some DJ’s have residencies, but places usually try to book each DJ one or two times during the same month. If they DJ two times in the same month, it’s common that they don’t play the same genre or maybe even join a collective. Each genre has its mix of DJ’s in Reykjavík. Some have been doing it for years and some not. I think the best part of the DJ culture here in Reykjavík is that it’s not too closed-off to newcomers. If you’re interested in DJ’ing you might have to network and get to know the lay of the land, and meet booking agents…