Monthly Archives: March 2016


Scintilla

Scintilla

Scintilla is a home textiles company that was founded in 2010 in Reykjavík, Iceland. In march 2014 Scintilla opened up a studio & showroom in Skipholt 25, 105 Reykjavík. Scintilla brings avant-garde ideas from fashion into home decor. Our designs are built on the Scandinavian design tradition, influenced by the extreme nature of Iceland. Scintilla’s aesthetics are contemporary and the design concept is progressive graphics with unique color palettes. Along with organic towels and posters that is in continuous development Scintilla expanded their product range in December 2015 by adding two new prints to the bedlinen collection. Scarves made of extra fine baby merino wool launching as well in December after being displayed at Design March in 2015. The newest addition is all new kitchen line that will be displayed at Design March 2016. Scintilla Hospitality offers as well a range of textiles for hotels and has worked on special projects in collaboration with clients such as Ion hotel, Blue Lagoon, Hilton Spa, Icelandair Hotel Marina Residence and many more. Scintilla strives at all times to be environmentally conscious and responsible. The Scintilla team consists out of enthusiastic professionals, who are passionate about creating a new vision with a different approach.


Quartet

Quartet

National Gallery of Iceland – January 15th to May 1st 2016 The National Gallery of Iceland kickstarts its exhibition programme with ‘Quartet’, an exhibition that incorporates the work of four contemporary artists: Gauthier Hubert, Chantal Joffe, Jockum Nordström, and Tumi Magnússon. While all of the works touch on the human being in and of itself, each one takes its own unique approach, exploring art, its history, and its makers from various viewpoints. Because the artists use different historical points of departure, ‘Quartet’ not only investigates humanity, but the ways artists have investigated it in the past as well. Established in 1884, the National Gallery of Iceland collects, conserves, researches, presents, and provides education about both Icelandic and international art. The gallery’s collection mainly consists of pieces from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Many of these pieces embody various landmarks in Icelandic art history, giving the museum a strong role in representing the movement of Icelandic art over the years. In addition to its educational and conservational roles, the gallery also holds exhibitions by Icelandic and foreign artists in its four exhibition rooms. One of these rooms, the Vasulka Chamber, is dedicated to video and electronic art. Alongside these rooms sits a gallery café and a bookshop that sells pieces of design and giftware. With its extensive and varied collection of both Icelandic and international art, the National Gallery has become one of the most prominent art forums in Iceland. It’s the place to go to see a bit of a history, and to catch a glimpse of what’s to come in the art world.


Design March @ Hannesarholt 2016

Design March @ Hannesarholt 2016

The 7th annual Design March is upon us this year in Iceland, and as per usual it is filled with Icelandic talent and design. This year in downtown Reykjavík there will be a cluster of shows with various designers co-existing in Hannesarholt, Grundarstig 10, 101 Reykjavík. Here is a quick overview of the group of designers exhibiting in Hannesarholt this year. Saga Kakala Exhibiting on the lower ground floor of Hannesarholt is Saga Kakala. The woman behind Saga Kakala is the Icelandic actress, MSc, and entrepreneur, Ingibjörg Gréta Gísladóttir. She operates together with various artists and designers for each one of her line of silk and cashmere scarves. Every collection tells its story and has its unique aesthetics. This year for Saga Kakala’s third collection, Ingibjörg collaborated with the Icelandic designer, Katrín Ólína Pétursdóttir. Katrín Ólína has developed a rich visual language that builds on research, experimentation and intuitive, creative drawing processes that combine the use of technology with the hand drawn. This line is named Goddesses as Katrín sought inspiration from goddesses from various parts of the world, like the Norse goddess Freyja and the Roman goddess Venus.   North Limited Situated on the second floor of Hannesar­holt are North Limited. North Limited is a group of Ice­landic­ designers, Guðrún Vald, Sigríður Hjaltdal and Þórunn Hannesdóttir. North Limited’s style is both contemporary and warm. Icelandic heritage influences them, and the outcome is beautiful objects mixed with elegance and Icelandic quirkiness. They mainly focus on design furniture and home accessories. Throughout the past six years, these designers have been making a name for themselves in Iceland and have only been exhibiting together for nearly two years at both Icelandic and international design fairs. North Limited focuses on classic design with high-quality production, focusing on both top-grade materials as well as the best craftsmanship possible for…


Like Clockwork: JS Watch Co. Reykjavík has time on their side

Like Clockwork: JS Watch Co. Reykjavík has time on their side

In a world in which big-box stores and mass production have long since become the norm, the idea of opening a small, family business specializing in limited-edition, handmade products may seem more like a nostalgic daydream than good business sense. Nevertheless, in 2005, friends Sigurður Gilbertsson, Júliús Heiðarsson, and Grímkell ­Sigurþórsson decided to take a leap of faith and found JS Watch Co. Reykjavík, ­Iceland’s first watch manufacturer, and, they joke, ‘probably the smallest watchmaker in the world.’ The idea may have been idealistic—Iceland certainly doesn’t have a long tradition of quality timepiece production—but the founders had good reason to be optimistic. They would be joined in their endeavour by Sigurður’s father, Gilbert Guðjónsson, a master watchmaker with nearly 50 years of experience. Gilbert started apprenticing as a watchmaker at the tender age of 16 and soon discovered a real passion for the craft, often electing to skip summer holidays and work long night and weekend hours in order to hone his skills. So many years later, once Gilbert had long owned and run his own successful watch repair shop in Reykjavík, the idea of launching a brand of Icelandic-­designed, ­Icelandic-manufactured specialty watches didn’t seem so crazy. In fact, it seemed like a lot of fun. Weathering the storm Starting as something of a luxury brand,­ JS Watch Co.’s first collection was made in an exclusive batch of just 100 watches. It sold out in less than six months. Following this success, Gilbert and his partners went on to successfully design, manufacture, and sell out of five more limited-edition collections. JS Watch Co. pieces were designed with longevity in mind—they were made to be heirlooms, Gilbert explains, durable watches that could be passed from one generation to another—and the shop’s attention to craftsmanship and quality ­manufacturing were quickly making the…


All Access to Fashionista

All Access to Fashionista

Svava Johansen is the founder of NTC, the umbrella company for fashion stores Galleri 17, EVA, Kultur, Companys, iGS Skór, and many others. She also recently opened up a new shoe store with her sister called Fló and Fransí in downtown Reykajvík. Check it out! If anyone knows about fashion in Reykja­vík, it’s her, so I sat down with Svava to hear her opinion on Icelandic style and also get some must-have fashion tips. Can you define “Icelandic style” for me?  Icelandic style is unique. In general, people are pretty trendy and well dressed. Young women—the under 30 crowd—tend to mix British trends together with Swedish ones. The outcome is a unique look. Over 30, women dress in a more designed way, still with a lot of British and Swedish influence. Icelandic designers are also becoming popular. What’s special about it? How is it different from other countries?  I think we add a lot more cool shoes and bags to our outfits. We don’t like to dress “sweet” like the French. No, we have an edgier look. Maybe it’s because of our heavy weather, but Icelandic women wear a lot of heavy shoes and ankle boots, more so than Europeans. We also like big wool coats, big scarves, and chunky boots. Everyone of course wants to look different but there’s still a definite “Icelandic” look on the streets. How would you describe your own style?  All my clothes have to be comfortable. I’ve done the “beauty is pain” thing [laughs], but not anymore! I love to wear clothes with beautiful fabrics, and twist classic pieces with more chic things. I try not to be too much of one or another—if I wear a classic jacket, then I twist it with used jeans and high heels or chunky ankle boots. If I…


Reykjavik By Design:  The Creative Minds Behind p3

Reykjavik By Design: The Creative Minds Behind p3

Situated in Miðstræti 12, 101 Reykja­vík, p3 is a studio and store that houses the dynamic Icelandic fashion labels Skaparinn, ASI MAR, Sævar Markús and REY by Rebekka Jónsdóttir. Reykjavík’s local fashion design scene is small but vibrant with designers creating timeless pieces for locals and tourists alike. Designers derive their aesthetic from different sources, but Reykjavík plays a role in the inspiration behind the work. Skaparinn, which translates to “the maker” in English, is a fashion label designed by Dúsa Ólafs­dóttir. Her clothes are created for the sophisticated woman, that’s clever and complex, power­ful and restrained; a woman that wants impeccably tailored, comfortable pieces that feature unique and gorgeous fabrics. Dúsa enhances femininity through the fluidity of the silhouettes, so her designs are clean and elegant. Designer Ási Mar Friðriks­son, who has focused on womens­wear, recently launched his first menswear line, ASI MAR that incorporates a modern silhouette with classical tailoring, blending modernity with classic clean cuts. Ási Mar specializes in contemporary womenswear that’s super stylish and elegant with a focus on clean lines. Sævar Markús Óskarsson’s designs feature tailored pieces mixed with silk dresses for women and a menswear line that uses fine wool and cotton shirts designed to be androgynous, similar to tailored women’s trousers, jackets and coats. His collections, which are mainly classic looks, are inspired by art and are colorful and playful, with deliberate classic cuts and a bit of understated androgyny. Reykjavík Fashion & Design sat down with the three designers to discuss their creations, inspiration and how working in Reykjavík impacts their work. Each of you has a very distinct style. How would you describe your work? Dúsa: The style of my clothes is feminine, modern with luxury fabrics like silk, wool and cashmere. I focus on womenswear and you see a lot of black and white…


Lindex - We make fashion feel good

Lindex – We make fashion feel good

Lindex is an international Swedish fashion brand offering ladies wear, ladies lingerie and children´s wear for the fashion- interested woman. The roots of the company stretch all the way to the year 1954 when two brothers established a ladies lingerie store in the small town of Allingsås in Sweden. The company has grown considerably from the 45 m2 store of those days and now operates over 500 stores in almost 20 countries around the world. Lindex operates five stores in three locations, Smáralind and Kringlan in Reykjavík and Glerártorg in Akureyri.From the beginning, the company has attracted visitors in the hundreds of thousands that have welcomed the Scandinavian design coupled together with an international flair through collaborations like with the world-renowned designer Jean Paul Gaultier and fashion icons Penelopé Cruz and Kate Hudson. Social responsibility Social responsibility is a key aspect to everything that Lindex does, from how it manufactures its clothing, the people that are involved in the process, the fabrics that are used all the way down to how the clothing is disposed of at the end of the cycle. This has been acknowledged for instance with Lindex being one of the 10 largest producers of organic cotton in the world. This February the company took the next step in the successful development of its brand with the introduction of the “We Make Fashion Feel Good” concept. In a clear and substantial way the fashion chain expresses what the Lindex brand stands for and what it offers to its customers. With “We Make Fashion Feel Good”, the fashion chain is communicating its inspiring and affordable fashion in a new way to its customers. The concept is being launched, in all of the company’s markets, by displaying the manifesto in Lindex store windows and online. Going forward, “We Make…


Bon Voyage! to Reykjavik Fashion & Design

Bon Voyage! to Reykjavik Fashion & Design

Creativity is what Iceland may be best known for. From 13th century poet Snorri Sturluson, to 20th Century Nobel Laureate Halldór Laxness, Icelandic intellectual property has been recognised globally. With latter-day music mavericks such as Mezzoforte, Sugarcubes, Björk, Sigur Rós, Of Monsters & Men, Gus Gus, Múm and Emiliana Torrini—not to mention film composers Jóhann Jóhannsson, Atli Örvarsson, Ólafur Arnalds and Máni Svavarsson— Icelandic music is now “googled” 20 times more frequently than Iceland itself. Music, fashion and design have always interacted with a certain type of ping-pong effect. From the white stockings of the Mozart era to the mop tops of The Beatles, let alone the platform footwear of Abba times, these related forces have proved to be vital in distinguishing the ever-evolving zeitgeists of our continents, and continue to do so. The same goes for evolutions in architecture and other forms of design. The timing of a new Icelandic fashion and design publication, dedicated to fashion and design, could not be better, in view of the fast-growing creative branches of Iceland. Presented in English, written and designed by our foremost experts, Reykjavík Fashion & Design is a most welcome addition to our somewhat limited variety of such endeavours. The newly revamped Old Harbour of Reykjavík is amongst what is being profiled in this first issue. Rightfully so. This cool new quarter truly reflects a new territory where the creative industries are successfully merged and represented in their most diverse forms: 90% of Iceland’s prolific recording studios located next to art galleries, exhibits and museums, the headquarters of authentic designers Farmers Market, top fashion designer Steinunn Sig’s workshop and boutique, CCP computer game head office and Sjávarklasinn, a dead-cool new hub for diverse creative business developments, to name a few. Bergsson, Bryggjan, Sjóminjasafnið, Valdís, Matur & Drykkur, Cocoo’s Nest,…